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Old 11-18-2020, 02:31 PM   #1
Thermaltake
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Default Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

I have one small problem, my friend told me MBO was working normally, and I kind of believe him. But I found one cut trace on the back of the MBO. It's located on the top left side when you turn it around behind the CPU fan1 (fan was connected in CPU Fan 2 when it was used). Can someone tell me is that trace somehow connected to CPU Fan 1 or with something else, what is it for acutally ? I put picture in attachment
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Last edited by Thermaltake; 11-18-2020 at 02:32 PM..
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Old 11-18-2020, 03:46 PM   #2
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

that aint cut .its burned because of a short
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Old 11-18-2020, 04:06 PM   #3
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

Quote:
Originally Posted by petehall347 View Post
that aint cut .its burned because of a short

Do you know maybe what that trace is for ? And would it be smart for that broken trace to be soldered with thin wire and make connection again ?

btw
That end of the trace is beside 24 pin connector for PSU. And most of the trace is along with 4 pin connector for fan and 3 pin connector of other fan.

Last edited by Thermaltake; 11-18-2020 at 04:15 PM..
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Old 11-18-2020, 04:36 PM   #4
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

need to find the short first and rectify then repair the track .
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Old 11-19-2020, 01:24 AM   #5
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

Quote:
Originally Posted by petehall347 View Post
need to find the short first and rectify then repair the track .
Yes, that's why I need to find out what is that trace used for. If someone can help me.

Last edited by Thermaltake; 11-19-2020 at 02:45 AM..
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Old 11-19-2020, 03:06 AM   #6
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

I'm not sure but I think It might have some connection with 24 pin connector

I put some pictures and circle some stuff
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File Type: jpg 2.jpg (580.7 KB, 30 views)
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Old 11-20-2020, 01:45 PM   #7
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

anyone ?
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Old 11-20-2020, 04:17 PM   #8
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

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Originally Posted by Thermaltake View Post
anyone ?
The boardview might help .
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Old 11-20-2020, 04:38 PM   #9
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

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Originally Posted by SMDFlea View Post
The boardview might help .
Thanks for boardview.

I look it up, and I can't figure it out if it's that cap C38 upper pin which is GND and it looks like on boardview trace is going to 24pin GND just like on the picture I attached up.

I just look at the board physically and can't really say if I'm right or not, because I don't have much experience.


P.S
Could it be that someone was connecting FAN when PC was ON, and burned the trace like that ?
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File Type: jpg 2.jpg (604.5 KB, 14 views)

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Old 11-21-2020, 01:09 AM   #10
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

You know, now this reminded me of a repair I did on an ASUS (or was it ASROCK, I can't recall exactly) motherboard that had a trace burned exactly like that in the upper-right corner of the board (but on the underside, just like yours.) This was back when I worked at one of the computer stores in the area. Another tech had already called the owner and told them their mobo is bad, so they should buy a new one. Out of curiosity (but due to lack of time), I just took the faulty mobo and resoldered the trace, connected it to a PSU, and tried powering the mobo up without checking anything. (Generally, this is a bad idea, as it could further damage traces or even your PSU possibly.) In my case, I just didn't care, since the board was likely going to get recycled. Miraculously, nothing burned and the motherboard worked again. I was stumped as to why that is and was pretty much convinced the trace would burn again and throw a smoke show. But I tested the mobo for a day on my bench, and it worked fine. I called the owner and told them if they still want to go with a new mobo or take the old mobo with the repair as-is. Owner decided to take the old mobo and use it. I called some days later to check up with him, and he said everything was still working fine. So I don't know what caused that burn exactly.

Unfortunately, I don't remember anything about the board, other than being a newer (at the time, and to me) ASUS/ASROCK board for Intel CPUs. So I can't say if it was the same board or not. If it is, it would be interesting to find if this was some kind of a design flaw. But I guess we may not know.
.
.
.
I see that you already have re-soldered the trace on yours.
Next, try using your multimeter to see if it connects to one of the pins on the 24-pin ATX connector. Basically, put your multimeter on the lowest RESISTANCE scale and touch the probes together. The resistance you read (usually will be less than 2 Ohms, though it will depend on the quality of the multimeter and probes) is your "short-circuit" resistance. Now place one probe on the trace you fixed (preferrably the black one) and use the red probe to touch each pin, one at a time, on the 24-pin ATX connector. Make sure to test each pin for at least 2-3 seconds, so as not to get fooled that there is a resistance when there isn't (for example, a cap charing somewhere.) The pin that reads continuous low / short-circuit resistance to the repaired trace (same as when you touched both multimeter probes together) is the one that is connected to this trace. If none of the pins on the ATX connector show such resistance, then that trace is NOT directly connected to the ATX connector. But you can continue using your multimeter in the way I mentioned above (i.e. move the red probe around on different pins and component leads) to check when you get a low / short-circuit resistance to that trace, so you can see exactly what it connects to. For example, if you suspect that trace does go to cap C38, then you should get a low / short-circuit resistance between the trace and one of the leads on cap C38. If not, then it's not connected to it.

Last edited by momaka; 11-21-2020 at 01:18 AM..
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Old 11-21-2020, 10:31 AM   #11
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

Quote:
Originally Posted by momaka View Post
You know, now this reminded me of a repair I did on an ASUS (or was it ASROCK, I can't recall exactly) motherboard that had a trace burned exactly like that in the upper-right corner of the board (but on the underside, just like yours.) This was back when I worked at one of the computer stores in the area. Another tech had already called the owner and told them their mobo is bad, so they should buy a new one. Out of curiosity (but due to lack of time), I just took the faulty mobo and resoldered the trace, connected it to a PSU, and tried powering the mobo up without checking anything. (Generally, this is a bad idea, as it could further damage traces or even your PSU possibly.) In my case, I just didn't care, since the board was likely going to get recycled. Miraculously, nothing burned and the motherboard worked again. I was stumped as to why that is and was pretty much convinced the trace would burn again and throw a smoke show. But I tested the mobo for a day on my bench, and it worked fine. I called the owner and told them if they still want to go with a new mobo or take the old mobo with the repair as-is. Owner decided to take the old mobo and use it. I called some days later to check up with him, and he said everything was still working fine. So I don't know what caused that burn exactly.

Unfortunately, I don't remember anything about the board, other than being a newer (at the time, and to me) ASUS/ASROCK board for Intel CPUs. So I can't say if it was the same board or not. If it is, it would be interesting to find if this was some kind of a design flaw. But I guess we may not know.
.
.
.
I see that you already have re-soldered the trace on yours.
Next, try using your multimeter to see if it connects to one of the pins on the 24-pin ATX connector. Basically, put your multimeter on the lowest RESISTANCE scale and touch the probes together. The resistance you read (usually will be less than 2 Ohms, though it will depend on the quality of the multimeter and probes) is your "short-circuit" resistance. Now place one probe on the trace you fixed (preferrably the black one) and use the red probe to touch each pin, one at a time, on the 24-pin ATX connector. Make sure to test each pin for at least 2-3 seconds, so as not to get fooled that there is a resistance when there isn't (for example, a cap charing somewhere.) The pin that reads continuous low / short-circuit resistance to the repaired trace (same as when you touched both multimeter probes together) is the one that is connected to this trace. If none of the pins on the ATX connector show such resistance, then that trace is NOT directly connected to the ATX connector. But you can continue using your multimeter in the way I mentioned above (i.e. move the red probe around on different pins and component leads) to check when you get a low / short-circuit resistance to that trace, so you can see exactly what it connects to. For example, if you suspect that trace does go to cap C38, then you should get a low / short-circuit resistance between the trace and one of the leads on cap C38. If not, then it's not connected to it.
Thanks for this detailed info.

I'll try with multimeter, not that good with it, but I'll try.
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Old 11-22-2020, 03:36 AM   #12
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

I measured it.

I have UNI-T multimetere UT139C, very nice multimeter, but never had time to play with it until now.

I place black probe in that 24pin GND (like on boardview picture) and with red probe touch upper contact of C38 resistor and it buzz with 000.5 ohms, also on that chip marked as PTU4 on the boardview all 4 down pins buzz when I touch them just like they should, and all other stuff around that area when I touched buzz.

So I guess everything is ok ?

And like I sad in my previous post could it be that my friend connected some fan when PC was turned ON and damaged the trace like that ?
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File Type: jpg 1.jpg (161.8 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg 3.jpg (557.9 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg 2.jpg (674.0 KB, 14 views)

Last edited by Thermaltake; 11-22-2020 at 03:45 AM..
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Old 11-22-2020, 04:47 AM   #13
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

You need to measure the other way around: from the wire link you soldered to each pin on the ATX connector until you find 000.5ohm.
If you do not find 000.5ohm on any pin then that trace does not go directly to the ATX connector.
It is quite likely it goes to pin 2 of the PTU4 chip: Nuvoton 4 Times Linear Fan Driver NCT3941S.
Then you would measure 000.5ohm both to ATX 12v pin and to pin 2 of that IC chip via your wire link.
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Old 11-22-2020, 05:22 AM   #14
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

Quote:
Originally Posted by Per Hansson View Post
You need to measure the other way around: from the wire link you soldered to each pin on the ATX connector until you find 000.5ohm.
If you do not find 000.5ohm on any pin then that trace does not go directly to the ATX connector.
It is quite likely it goes to pin 2 of the PTU4 chip: Nuvoton 4 Times Linear Fan Driver NCT3941S.
Then you would measure 000.5ohm both to ATX 12v pin and to pin 2 of that IC chip via your wire link.
Oh ok, so I need to touch that soldered wire and other stuff to see if there is 0.005 ohm. But there are sooo many things connected to that trace...
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Old 11-22-2020, 07:17 AM   #15
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

I measure now from wire link to that upper contact of that C38 cap, and it measures 342,2 ohm, and when I touch lower pins from PTU4 chip I got same measure, that's not ok or ?

Last edited by Thermaltake; 11-22-2020 at 07:19 AM..
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Old 11-22-2020, 10:48 AM   #16
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

Quote:
Originally Posted by Per Hansson View Post
You need to measure the other way around: from the wire link you soldered to each pin on the ATX connector until you find 000.5ohm.
If you do not find 000.5ohm on any pin then that trace does not go directly to the ATX connector.
It is quite likely it goes to pin 2 of the PTU4 chip: Nuvoton 4 Times Linear Fan Driver NCT3941S.
Then you would measure 000.5ohm both to ATX 12v pin and to pin 2 of that IC chip via your wire link.
I measure now from soldered wire to all 24 pins in ATX, and a lot of them measure 325ohms, few of them are 000.5

P.S
Friend told me to scratch the insulation of one end and other end of the trace where that wire is and try to measure to see if there is connection. And I did, and there is connection it buzz and measure 000.5ohm.

Last edited by Thermaltake; 11-22-2020 at 11:32 AM..
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Old 11-24-2020, 01:04 AM   #17
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thermaltake View Post
I measure now from soldered wire to all 24 pins in ATX, and a lot of them measure 325ohms, few of them are 000.5
Well, which pins exactly measured 000.5 Ohms?

Remember, we are trying to help you troubleshoot without seeing what you're seeing exactly. So more info/details is always helpful. Pictures too, if needed.

Also, whenever you get that low resistance, make sure it stays that way. In other words, if you measure resistance between two contacts and it shows 000.5, but only instantly, and then resistance goes up, then that those contacts are not really connected. On the other hand, if resistance stays 000.5 for many seconds (or at least 2, that is), then that means the two contacts are likely connected together.
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Old 11-29-2020, 01:18 PM   #18
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Default Re: Asrock X79 Extreme4 trace cut

Turned On the board, and it is working normally. No white smoke or any smoke
fans are all working without problem, all memory modules are inserted and recognized as well as CPU. I was lucky I guess like momaka said.


Thank you everyone for helping with measuring and all. Happy Holidays!

Last edited by Thermaltake; 11-29-2020 at 01:27 PM..
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