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Old 06-11-2021, 09:50 PM   #1
clearchris
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Default 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

I know at least some of you have 3d printers. So show us what you have printed.

I'll start this is my latest. Not my design, but happy I have this printed out. My resistors were all in a box, and the strips they were attached to long ago lost their stickiness. So, I sorted them all (ouch) and put them in the drawers. I need to print some labels and attach them, but at least they are in order now.

There are some pretty impressive prints using the same design here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3873672/makes

ResistorStorageBox.jpg
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Old 06-11-2021, 11:25 PM   #2
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

TBH I've not really printed much for myself, think the only jewel I made with my 3d printer is the fix for my electric knife that was in the "Pointless Repairs" thread.

Another silly thing that I made were clips that I could clip my box fan into a window, before I was using a ladder as a weight to push the fan against the window, now with the clips the fan holds against the window so I can cool the house at night.

As for stuff that I just printed, nothing much spectacular. I liked the button cell boxes on Thingiverse, no more dropping a whole bunch of LR44's and CR2032s that short each other out. Then there's the knobs and buttons available, I have a 3d printed knob on a virtual trash pick UHF LMRS radio I'm using as a 70cm amateur radio. Also made a case for my antenna analyzer.

Then there's the pending... I need to make a box for my analog ESR meter, and a box for my AVR90S2313 DDS signal generator. Both of these need to be custom.
Also dabbling in trying to make parts: I have an old CB handheld transceiver that was missing its battery pack, a 3d printed pack sounds like something. I'm also thinking about creating the "tone generator" pack for my Kenwood TR-2500 attachment so I can switch CTCSS tones, but that might be a bit ways away. I'm using the internal tone generator at the moment, which is annoying because not all repeaters use the same tone.

Alas most of the stuff I've printed is for friends ... I don't think I've gotten through a full reel of plastic for stuff for me, but got through more than two reels for others.

---

Oh...one project that's sort of indefinitely on hold because I have no need as it's currently working:
My Tektronix 2465's fan impeller blades are in bad shape. Guess what I'm going to make when it breaks?
I'm quite surprised how quiet the 2465 is, and hope that a PLA 3d-printed impeller blades will be quieter than having to retrofit a noisy muffin box fan - of which an adapter could be made from plastic...

Last edited by eccerr0r; 06-11-2021 at 11:34 PM..
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Old 06-18-2021, 07:54 PM   #3
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

and as said in the other thread...a 3d printed case for my transistortestor is pending...
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Old 06-19-2021, 02:55 AM   #4
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

I also have a 3D printer but my problem is I do not seem to have very much free time on hand anymore

One of the modification I am going to do to my 3D printer is to replace the cooling fan for one that has a temperature sensor built on the fan and make the temperature sensor mount on the heat sink so it controls the speed or use a temperature controller out of computer switching power supply

I work the night shift for a seafood processing company and for awhile I was working 6 days a week

Now I work 5 days a week and have a little bit more time but not enough time for projects that are time consuming

But I have heard that we might be going to 4 days a week which is what the job was advanced as and if we do go to 4 days a week then I will have more free time do some time consuming projects again
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9 PC LCD Monitor
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25 Servo Drives 220/460 3 Phase
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These two repairs where found with a ESR meter...> Temp at 50*F then at 90*F the ESR reading more than 10%

1 Over Head Crane Current Sensing Board ( VFD Failure Five Years Later )
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All of these had CAPs POOF
All of the mosfet that are taken out by bad caps

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Old 06-19-2021, 07:00 AM   #5
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Nice thing about robotics including the 3d printer is that it's (well, ideally) fire and forget.

"Ideally" ... hopefully you don't get a pile of spaghetti... (and you don't find watching one mesmerizing...)
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Old 06-20-2021, 01:26 PM   #6
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Quote:
Originally Posted by sam_sam_sam View Post
One of the modification I am going to do to my 3D printer is to replace the cooling fan for one that has a temperature sensor built on the fan and make the temperature sensor mount on the heat sink so it controls the speed or use a temperature controller out of computer switching power supply
If you are doing this for the hotend so it's quiet, I'd just buy a larger, quiet fan like a noctua. Depending on the printer, you can control them with PWM so they are basically silent. Aside from startup and cooldown though, that fan shouldn't vary a whole lot or you are going to get jams. By the time a sensor picks up an increase in temp, the damage is likely already done.

Quote:
"Ideally" ... hopefully you don't get a pile of spaghetti...
For as many pictures of that as I have seen, it has only happened to me once. So long as your stay and watch the first layer go down, you have a very high chance of a successful print.
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Old 06-21-2021, 02:04 AM   #7
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

I've had capellini (what people normally call spaghetti) and REAL spaghetti. Fortunately "real" spaghetti I can roll back onto the reel and reuse.

The capellini one hopes to minimize. The "real" spaghetti was from when the extruder path broke...

Ugh. The transistortester case on thingiverse sucks. Will have to mod it with a hot knife directly on the plastic instead of printing another one with mods in the source...
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Old 06-21-2021, 08:21 AM   #8
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Quote:
Originally Posted by eccerr0r View Post
I've had capellini (what people normally call spaghetti) and REAL spaghetti. Fortunately "real" spaghetti I can roll back onto the reel and reuse.

The capellini one hopes to minimize. The "real" spaghetti was from when the extruder path broke...

Ugh. The transistortester case on thingiverse sucks. Will have to mod it with a hot knife directly on the plastic instead of printing another one with mods in the source...
Which one? And why can't you mod it before printing? Modifying stls isn't great, but it's doable.
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Old 06-21-2021, 10:29 AM   #9
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

well, mainly because it wasn't expected it was not going to work perfectly, and well, it's a waste of plastic to modify and print another one when there's just one problem...
...not like I'm going to be mass producing these!
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Old 06-21-2021, 10:51 AM   #10
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Quote:
Originally Posted by clearchris View Post
If you are doing this for the hotend so it's quiet, I'd just buy a larger, quiet fan like a noctua. Depending on the printer, you can control them with PWM so they are basically silent. Aside from startup and cooldown though, that fan shouldn't vary a whole lot or you are going to get jams. By the time a sensor picks up an increase in temp, the damage is likely already
I am talking about the cooling fan in the power supply this little fan is very noisy when it is running as far as I know it only comes on when the heated bed is being powered on
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Old 06-21-2021, 03:13 PM   #11
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Quote:
Originally Posted by sam_sam_sam View Post
I am talking about the cooling fan in the power supply this little fan is very noisy when it is running as far as I know it only comes on when the heated bed is being powered on
If it only comes on sometimes, it already has some type of heat sensor in there. Might be on the fan or on the board. If it's on the board just get a low RPM noctua fan and replace it. Or you could lower the voltage to the fan with a small buck converter.
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Old 06-21-2021, 06:52 PM   #12
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

chances are it's being cheap and connected in parallel with the heat bed. Though technically it should be "properly designed" to not generate heat, alas, penny pinched is penny earned...
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Old 06-21-2021, 07:22 PM   #13
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

That requires a level of integration with the power supply that I haven't seen before. What machine is it?
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Old 06-21-2021, 07:32 PM   #14
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

But the bigger issue is that when the bed heater is ON the temperature sensitive is is the biggest issue in that it causes the power supply to cycle way to often and how I know this it is because it hooked up with a UPS device that has a amp bar graphics that pegs the meter range

The plain is put a PWM controller on it and have it stay on longer yes I know that it might make the temperature sensitive to swing a little bit but if adjusted correctly it will probably be okay
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Old 06-21-2021, 08:32 PM   #15
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Depends on how well the heatbed is tuned with its PID controller, then again it could be slow bang-bang and peg the meter once in a while. In any case when it's heating from cold it will be on 100% ...

Heatbeds tend to be well over 100W and use more power than the rest of the printer - hotend and all.
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Old 06-22-2021, 08:19 AM   #16
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

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Originally Posted by eccerr0r View Post
Depends on how well the heatbed is tuned with its PID controller, then again it could be slow bang-bang and peg the meter once in a while. In any case when it's heating from cold it will be on 100% ...

Heatbeds tend to be well over 100W and use more power than the rest of the printer - hotend and all.
When you first turn on the bed heater it fine the problem starts when the bed heater gets to temperature is where the problem begins it might be on for 30 seconds and for 20 seconds and keep repeating

I would refer it be ON for a minute or more and then turn off for awhile and keep doing it this way
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Old 06-22-2021, 08:27 AM   #17
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Not clear what the "problem" is... it's expected that the heater will need to turn on and off to maintain temperature. Perhaps it's a perceived problem when the fan is simply connected in parallel with the heater and cools only when the heatbed is on, which sort of makes sense because the transistor dissipates heat only when the bed is actively heating.

Perhaps LPF the fan control signal is "preferred" where the fan stays on regardless if the bed is actively heating or not, despite it being enabled for the print job?

To be honest the heat generated/wasted by the transistor should be... dumped on the heatbed

Last edited by eccerr0r; 06-22-2021 at 08:32 AM..
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Old 06-22-2021, 02:50 PM   #18
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Also, consider insulating under the heat bed if it isn't already. You can get the insulation cheap, and would be a direct reduction in hotbed "on" time.
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Old 07-05-2021, 10:01 AM   #19
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Just modded this soldering iron tip holder

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1212686/

to add a 3mm per row slope going up towards the back. Pretty pleased with it. If my day doesn't go to hell any worse than it already has, I should be able to clean up the code and upload to thingiverse today or tomorrow. It's configurable for slope and number of holes, etc.

IMG_20210705_103817.jpg

render.png

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Old 07-07-2021, 09:13 PM   #20
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Default Re: 3d printed electronics bench accessories and equipment

Sloped solder tip holder posted with code:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4902516
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