Badcaps.net Forum
Go Back   Badcaps Forums > Welcome to the Badcaps.net Tech Forum! > Frequently Asked Questions (No Posting)
Register FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-14-2019, 09:05 PM   #1
TechGeek
Computer Geek
 
TechGeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
City & State: Hell's Front Porch, Texas
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120/2/[email protected]
I'm a: Hardcore Geek
Posts: 1,634
Default How To Stop CRT Flicker

[PART 1 OF 2]

Ever gotten a CRT monitor and noticed an irritating flicker?

Here's how to get rid of it (or at least make it far less annoying).

Method 1: Increase Refresh Rate
1) Get to your display settings. This varies from OS to OS.
For Windows (95 to 2000, XP to 7 with Icons Mode, XP to 7 with Classic Start Menu
(NOT Classic Start))
1) Open the Start Menu
(For 95 to 2000 and XP to 7 with Classic Start Menu)
Click "All Programs", then "Accessories", then "Control Panel".
(XP to 7 with normal Start Menu)
Click "Control Panel" on the right bar of the start menu.
2) Open the Display options panel
(XP to 7 with Icons Mode)
Double-click on "Displays".
(XP to 7 with Categories Mode)
Click "Hardware and Sound", then "Displays".
3) Click "Change adapter properties".
4) Click the "Settings" tab. Make sure that the "Display unsupported settings" dialog box is UNCHECKED.
5) Click the dropdown box by "Refresh Rate". Select the highest refresh rate available.
5a) If the highest available refresh rate is already in use, click on "Display resolution". Change it to the nest lowest available resolution. Then try changing the refresh rate again.
6) Click "Apply". Your screen should go blank for only a few seconds and you may hear at least 1 click.
6a) If you get a message telling you that you are "out of range" or something similar, wait 15 seconds and Windows will revert back to it's original settings. Try the next resolution down.
7) Repeat the activity producing the unwanted flicker. If it's gone or reduced to a tolerable level, proceed to Step 8. If not, repeat steps 5 and 6 again.
8) Click "OK". Then close Control Panel. You are done.

(No Mac instruction available as I have no experience with them.)

Linux: Varies widely and depends on your desktop environment.
Xfce4:
1) Open the Whisker Menu. Type "displays" and press Enter.
2) Click the dropdown box by "Refresh Rate". Select the highest refresh rate available.
5a) If the highest available refresh rate is already in use, click on "Resolution". Change it to the nest lowest available resolution. Then try changing the refresh
rate again.
3) Click "Apply". Your screen should go blank for only a few seconds and you may hear at least 1 click.
6a) If you get a message telling you that you are "out of range" or something
similar, see Troubleshooting.
4) Repeat the activity producing the unwanted flicker. If it's gone or reduced to a tolerable level, proceed to Step 5. If not, repeat steps 2 and 3 again.
5) Click "OK". Then click Close. You are done.


Method 2: Decrease monitor brightness.
The procedure for doing this varies widely from monitor to monitor. Here are generic
instructions. For best results, consult the owner's manual. If you do not have the
owner's manual, Google the make and model of your monitor followed by "owner's manual". For example:
"mitsubishi diamond pro 2070sb owner's manual"
Read it and follow the instructions for adjusting the brightness.
Generic Instructions:
1) Press a menu button. Use the menu buttons to access the picture settings.
2) Using the menu buttons, access the brightness control.
3) Adjust the brightness down until the flicker becomes tolerable. If the flicker is
not tolerable at any brightness, see "Increase Refresh Rate" and/or "Increase Refresh Rate (Advanced Users)".
4) Once the brightness is set so flicker is tolerable, exit the menu.

Method 3: Increase Refresh Rate (Advanced Users)
I do NOT know how to use Custom Resolution Utility. Here is a guide on how to use
it: https://www.monitortests.com/forum/T...on-Utility-CRU

1) Find the scanrate limits of your monitor. They are expressed in Hz (for vertical scanrate limit) and kHz (for horizontal scanrate limit). Refer to your owner's manual OR Google the make and model of your monitor followed by "specs". For example: "mitsubishi diamond pro 710 specs"

2) Note the scanrate limits.


---WARNING: THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS ARE FOR LINUX ONLY. USE THE CRU GUIDE FROM HERE ON.---

3) Open up a Terminal. Type 'cvt <Default max resolution width> <Default max resolution height> <Desired refresh rate>'. For example: '
Code:
cvt 1600 1200 75
'.
You will get something back like this:
Code:
# 1600x1200 74.98 Hz (CVT 1.92M3) hsync: 94.09 kHz; pclk: 204.75 MHz
Modeline "1600x1200_75.00"  204.75  1600 1720 1888 2176  1200 1203 1207 1255 -hsync +vsync
Look at the hsync field. If it is ABOVE the monitor's maximum horizontal scanrate, try the cvt command again, except using a lower refresh rate. Keep decreasing the refresh rate until hsync is at least 1kHz below your monitor's maximum horizontal scanrate. Select the part AFTER 'modeline', i.e:
Code:
"1600x1200_75.00"  204.75  1600 1720 1888 2176  1200 1203 1207 1255 -hsync +vsync
Press Ctrl+Shift+C to copy this modeline.

4) Type xrandr and press Enter. Find the monitor you want to apply the custom resolution to and note the port it's connected to.
5) Type the following:
Code:
xrandr --newmode
Here, press Ctrl+Shift+V to paste the modeline in. If you do not see a prompt already, press Enter.
6) Type the following:
Code:
xrandr --addmode <Port the monitor is connected to> <Name of modeline>
Replace <Port the monitor is connected to> with the port you noted. Replace <Name of modeline> with the part of the modeline that is in quotes, such as "1600x1200_75.00", except no quotes. For example:
Code:
xrandr --addmode VGA-0 1600x1200_75.00
and press Enter.

7) Open your display settings. Select the display in question. Select "Refresh Rate". Then choose the new, higher refresh rate. Click 'Apply'. Your monitor should go blank for a few seconds. Once the picture returns, close the display settings and Terminal. you are done.
__________________
Don't buy those $10 PSU "specials". They fail, and they have taken whole computers with them.

For computer parts, go to Newegg
OR
Amazon.

For electrical stuff(pushbuttons, capacitors, etc), use Digikey
OR
Mouser.

My computer doubles as a space heater.

Windows 10? Only if you like forced, buggy updates and 24/7 telemetry.

Samsung = Seagate = Seatrash = Trashgate
Don't buy Seagate drives. Don't use Seagate drives. If you have any in service right now, make plans to replace them ASAP.


TechGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 11:04 PM   #2
eccerr0r
Solder Sloth
 
eccerr0r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
City & State: CO
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 5,137
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

Things are so much easier in Linux nowadays with EDID and VESA standardization... before these standards, getting those modeline numbers took a bit of work, and even worse if you didn't have the data for your monitor to compute the modelines...

... and there was also the risk of making the magic smoke leak out of your monitor if you got the modeline numbers a bit wrong...

Last edited by eccerr0r; 12-15-2019 at 11:06 PM..
eccerr0r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 06:37 AM   #3
TechGeek
Computer Geek
 
TechGeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
City & State: Hell's Front Porch, Texas
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120/2/[email protected]
I'm a: Hardcore Geek
Posts: 1,634
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

Quote:
Originally Posted by eccerr0r View Post
Things are so much easier in Linux nowadays with EDID and VESA standardization... before these standards, getting those modeline numbers took a bit of work, and even worse if you didn't have the data for your monitor to compute the modelines...

... and there was also the risk of making the magic smoke leak out of your monitor if you got the modeline numbers a bit wrong...
Especially if it was one of the el-cheapo ones that just *accepted* whatever it was given without checking to see if it was a valid signal that was in range, an out of range signal, or even a toaster. I've read quite a bit of stories about the horizontal section blowing up in monitors when too high of a horizontal refresh rate was fed into it.

Higher refresh rate = higher frequency on flyback = higher B+ and related voltage rails = closer to finding the weak link

Last edited by TechGeek; 12-16-2019 at 06:57 AM.. Reason: L7C34 +even
TechGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2019, 06:26 PM   #4
momaka
master hoarder
 
momaka's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
City & State: VA (NoVA)
My Country: U.S.A.
Line Voltage: 120 VAC, 60 Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 9,754
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

...
Or you can use software like RivaTuner, PowerStrip, or MSI Afterburner (I think!) to set a custom resolution with a custom refresh rate, as some monitors (particularly BNC-connected ones) will always default to 60 Hz (especially in Windows XP and older.) If using a relatively new GPU (anything made after the mid-2000), both nVidia and ATI include options in their software to override the default resolutions and refresh rates. But like you said, check what your monitor is capable of so to make things easier (and possibly save a cheap/old monitor from going bad if it doesn't have any proper protections.) That said, even most cheap CRT monitors tend to have protection again over-scanning. But constantly getting an "out of range" error can get annoying after a while.

On the topic of refresh rates... I always try to run my CRTs @ 85 Hz. I'll drop the resolution if I have to, just to keep the refresh rate at 85 Hz. Sure I can tolerate 75 Hz and even 72, but the flicker is noticeable and does cause a little more strain on my eyes. At 85 Hz, I can be using my monitors all day and not have any issues at all.

Also, for games that can keep up their FPS above the refresh rate of the monitor, I find that 60 Hz looks quite smooth, but still not 100% seamless, regardless if I have v-sync on or off. At 75 Hz, things look better. And at 85 Hz with full v-sync... on a CRT... games are smooth like molten butter. I'd say probably equivalent to an LCD @ 120 Hz. And even without v-sync, things still look good on a CRT without tearing, unlike on LCDs. Hence why I still game on my CRTs. As bonus, I also don't need to use anti-aliasing, since CRTs naturally have non-square pixels and thus smooth "pixel" edges.

Last edited by momaka; 12-18-2019 at 06:39 PM..
momaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 07:23 AM   #5
eccerr0r
Solder Sloth
 
eccerr0r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
City & State: CO
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 5,137
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

It's 2020. How many people still use CRTs?

I still have two CRT monitors, one is hooked up to my RAID backup machine though the machine is kind of broken right now. Nevertheless the occasional time I need to look at the machine, it's its monitor...
eccerr0r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 09:11 AM   #6
momaka
master hoarder
 
momaka's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
City & State: VA (NoVA)
My Country: U.S.A.
Line Voltage: 120 VAC, 60 Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 9,754
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

*Raises hand proudly*
Yes, I still use CRTs.
Almost exclusively, actually.
My LCDs are only for testing or if I need to put up a temporary PC setup somewhere.

Here is an old picture I put on badcaps showing my setup some 5 years ago or so.
https://www.badcaps.net/forum/attach...0&d=1499215509

I've changed/swapped out some of the CRTs on my desk for others, as did a few PCs. (Also de-cluttered in some areas, but made more clutter in others, especially lately after my last job, where I kept bringing in stuff from the dumpster/trash.) But it's still an accurate representation of my setup more or less.
momaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2020, 07:45 AM   #7
Uranium-235
Muffins
 
Uranium-235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
City & State: tehas
My Country: US
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Professional Tech
Posts: 3,571
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

Quote:
Originally Posted by momaka View Post
*Raises hand proudly*
Yes, I still use CRTs.
Almost exclusively, actually.
My LCDs are only for testing or if I need to put up a temporary PC setup somewhere.

Here is an old picture I put on badcaps showing my setup some 5 years ago or so.
https://www.badcaps.net/forum/attach...0&d=1499215509

I've changed/swapped out some of the CRTs on my desk for others, as did a few PCs. (Also de-cluttered in some areas, but made more clutter in others, especially lately after my last job, where I kept bringing in stuff from the dumpster/trash.) But it's still an accurate representation of my setup more or less.
do you game?
__________________
Cap Datasheet Depot: http://www.paullinebarger.net/DS/
^If you have datasheets not listed PM me
Uranium-235 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2020, 10:10 AM   #8
momaka
master hoarder
 
momaka's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
City & State: VA (NoVA)
My Country: U.S.A.
Line Voltage: 120 VAC, 60 Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 9,754
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uranium-235 View Post
do you game?
I do.

Mostly Fortnite nowadays, but occasionally CS Source / CS GO and Dirt Rally as well.
CSS and CSGO look great on these monitors: 1280x960 @ 85 Hz is probably about as smooth as 120/144 Hz on an LCD, since CRTs don't show tearing and have virtually zero image response time. As for Fortnite, I'm currently playing it on a i5-2500 with an HD6850 video card, because now that it's summer and getting hotter, I've mothballed my power-hungry hardware. Thus, I don't get really good framerates (and especially frametimes) in Fortnite. Actually, I'm running the game capped @ 60 Hz to get more stable FPS (and lower GPU/CPU power consumption). 3D resolution is set 66% scale on 1152x864... so that's a lot lower than 720p , though still higher than 480p. You might think such low resolutions look like crap... and on an LCD, indeed they do. But on those CRTs above, the game actually looks quite smooth and not pixely at all. If all I had was LCD monitors, I probably wouldn't play Fortnite at all - not at a low resolution like that. I tried it, though, and almost got a headache.

Last edited by momaka; 06-17-2020 at 10:15 AM..
momaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2020, 03:24 PM   #9
eccerr0r
Solder Sloth
 
eccerr0r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
City & State: CO
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 5,137
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

I still have a 19" shadowmask and a 20" trinitron. However no, I just use the LCDs, no warmup time and don't get as warm...

The 20" trinitron can do 2048x1536 @60 (and the 19" shadowmask can even do [email protected]) so technically it has higher resolution than my LCDs, alas it's not enough of a benefit for me to prefer it over LCDs. I just run my LCDs at native 1280x1024.
eccerr0r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2020, 05:15 PM   #10
momaka
master hoarder
 
momaka's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
City & State: VA (NoVA)
My Country: U.S.A.
Line Voltage: 120 VAC, 60 Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 9,754
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

Quote:
Originally Posted by eccerr0r View Post
The 20" trinitron can do 2048x1536 @60 (and the 19" shadowmask can even do [email protected]) so technically it has higher resolution than my LCDs, alas it's not enough of a benefit for me to prefer it over LCDs.
*sigh* Here we go again, falling into discussion about resolutions, as if it's the late 2000's and "HD" video all over again.

The high resolution of CRTs (even compared to early LCDs) was never their stronghold. It's the deep black colors (in a dark room, of course) and higher refresh rate without input lag and pixel lag that made them better for video editing and gaming (i.e. any kind of moving image.) Some will even claim CRTs were better for photo editing, but I'm a bit split on that one, because all CRTs tend to have a bit of tinting after they age for a while (which may or may not be easily corrected), and this is most visible on a grayscale palletes.

When it comes to doing office work / viewing of static images, I too would take an LCD. They take less space, always visible in dark or light rooms, and run cooler / use less energy.

Last edited by momaka; 06-25-2020 at 05:16 PM..
momaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2020, 10:26 AM   #11
i4004
Badcaps Veteran
 
i4004's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
City & State: Hrvatska, Dalmacija
Posts: 1,956
Default Re: How To Stop CRT Flicker

Quote:
Originally Posted by eccerr0r View Post
I still have a 19" shadowmask and a 20" trinitron. However no, I just use the LCDs, no warmup time and don't get as warm...

The 20" trinitron can do 2048x1536 @60 (and the 19" shadowmask can even do [email protected]) so technically it has higher resolution than my LCDs, alas it's not enough of a benefit for me to prefer it over LCDs. I just run my LCDs at native 1280x1024.
crt doesn't even have the proper, discrete pixels, inspect it under magnifying glass. so text sharpness will always be lower than lcd.
but colors and hiding (for example) video/image compression artefacts....lcd will never be able to match it.
i4004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Badcaps.net Technical Forums 2003 - 2020
Powered by vBulletin ®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:07 PM.
Did you find this forum helpful?